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Immigrant Visas - Providing Accurate Information
 

Bangla

Providing Accurate Information:

Please provide truthful information both spoken and in writing in your interview.  If any information is not correct, you can correct it during your interview without penalty.  After your interview, if we discover that information you gave us was false or misleading, you may be penalized, including being permanently prevented from entering the United States.

Penalties for Providing Fraudulent Information:

The consequences of providing fraudulent information, in any form, in a visa case are extremely serious. You may lose the benefit that you are seeking for immigrating to the United States and can be barred from ever entering the United States. We aggressively pursue fraud cases, referring individuals to our in-house investigators or the police for investigation whenever fraud is suspected.

Applicants have told us that they have committed fraud because they were told by someone outside the embassy they needed a certain document the applicant was missing and that for a fee the document could be produced.  Please do not listen to these people.  If you do not have a required document at the time of your interview we will tell you what you are missing and how to obtain a genuine document. 

Other people have told us they have committed fraud because they wanted to keep their family together and were told by someone outside the embassy that they could provide documents that would fool the embassy.  Please do not listen to these people.  Giving us fraudulent documents can lead to your entire family being prevented from ever going to the United States. 

There are many different categories of visas available to help families reunite, including:

  • F1 - Unmarried sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, and their children under age 21
  • F2A - Spouses and minor children (under age 21) of legal permanent residents (Green Card holders)
  • F2B - Unmarried sons and daughters (over age 21) of legal permanent residents (Green Card holders)
  • F3 - Married sons and daughters of U.S. citizens, and their spouses and children (unmarried and under age 21).
  • F4 -Brothers and sisters of United States citizens, and their spouses and unmarried children under age 21, provided the U.S. citizens are at least 21 years of age.

Do not risk your family’s chances of immigrating to the United States by providing fraudulent information at your visa interview.
At the time of your interview, if you think any incorrect information may have been provided to the interviewing officer concerning your case please tell the officer immediately.  Applicants are not penalized for providing corrected information at interviews.
There are three common trends of fraud in immigration visa cases found in Bangladesh.

1. Age fraud
2. Relationship fraud, and
3. Employment based fraud

Age fraud:

Age fraud means claiming an individual is a different age than he or she actually is, for purposes of obtaining a visa or other immigration benefit.  Providing legitimate documents with false information to support their age claims is considered age fraud.  We thoroughly investigate cases in which we believe age fraud is involved and if fraud is found, the applicants in a visa case can be barred from ever traveling to the United States.  If an applicant provides fraudulent documents or other information to someone else, even a family member, to help that person obtain immigrant benefits they should not obtain under U.S. law, that is considered alien smuggling.  Alien smuggling is a violation of U.S. law and doing this can make a person ineligible for a visa.

Relationship Fraud:

Relationship fraud means claiming a relationship, for example to be a spouse, or child, or brother or sister or parent, or the identity, of someone else in order to obtain a visa or other immigration benefit.  Some petitioners will pretend to be married or engaged to beneficiaries when in reality they are married to someone else.  Others may claim children to be theirs when in fact they are the child of other people.  Applicants may face many years of ineligibility or be permanently barred from entering the United States, if the claimed relationship is proven to be fraudulent.

Employment Based Fraud:

Employment-based fraud means providing documents or other information to support a claim that an individual has the qualities required to fulfill a position that he or she has been petitioned for in the United States.  There are also some cases where the U.S.-based business itself produces fraud concerns. 

If someone commits any of the above mentioned frauds, then h/she may face the following ineligibilities under the Immigration and Nationality Act:

212(a)(6)(E): This is a permanent ineligibility applicable to any alien who at any time knowingly has encouraged, induced, assisted, abetted, or aided any other alien to enter or try to enter the United States in violation of U.S. law.  

212(a)(6)(C)(1): This permanent ineligibility is applicable to persons who willfully misrepresent a material fact or conceals information relevant in their attempt to procure a visa, or any other benefit provided under the Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended. 

In some but not all cases waivers are available for ineligibilities; please see our page on waivers.